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  • Welcome to The John Marshall Law Review. The Law Review is one of the oldest and most respected honors programs at The John Marshall Law School. Subscribe now »
  • The Law Review’s purpose is to publish scholarly works on a broad range of legal topics in four issues each year. The publication includes works written by judges, legal scholars, noted practitioners and John Marshall students. Read more articles »

Freedom of Information, Government Secrets and the Challenge of New Technology

By Law Review on Friday, February 28th, 2014
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By:  Michael P. Seng[i], Professor, The John Marshall Law School I.  Introduction The United States government’s actions against Sgt. Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden and other whistleblowers raise serious questions about freedom of information, government secrets, and new technology.  The Obama administration has prosecuted more persons for leaking government secrets than the number previously prosecuted…

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Playing All the Wrong Cards: Asserting Privacy Rights to User Information Submitted to Social Networks

By Michael Taege on Saturday, November 17th, 2012
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A. Contracting for Privacy in a Public Forum Modern day law and supernatural legend rarely intersect. This does not mean correctly understanding a legal issue is immune from aid rendered by such stories. For example, Goethe’s Faust provides an illustrative parallel to standardized agreements, or adhesion contracts. In Faust, the protagonist seeks a pure moment…

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All Bark and No Bite: Analyzing the Role of “Drew’s Law” in the Murder Conviction of Drew Peterson [1]

By Micheal Taege on Thursday, September 20th, 2012
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The following are news reports surrounding the recent trial of Drew Peterson for the murder of Kathleen Savio, accompanied by a factual explanation: Drew Peterson was convicted of first-degree murder and is currently awaiting sentencing.[2] True, he was found guilty for the murder of Kathleen Savio.[3] The trial was a “potentially precedent-setting case centered on…

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Google Books and Orphaned Works

By Bernadette M. Savarese Coppola on Friday, August 17th, 2012
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The Google Book Project, as litigated inAuthors Guild, et al. v. Google, Inc.,[1] demonstrates the challenges facing the current model of copyright laws as applied to orphaned works. In 2009, Google, Inc. proposed a settlement agreement, the Amended Settlement Agreement (“ASA”), which, in part, provided for an “opt-out” policy through which rights holders could exclude…

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