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The Importance of Restorative Practices in Family Law

By Allison Trendle on Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

In Marriage Story, Alan Alda’s character wisely told his client, “I want you to know that eventually this will all be over, and whatever we win or lose, it’ll be the two of you having to figure this out together.”[1] Alda’s character referenced the contentious nature of divorce. Divorce proceedings often pit parties against each…

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Juvenile Justice Over Time: The Implementation of Wisconsin’s Statutory Exclusion for Certain Juvenile-Aged Offenders

By Rachel Martin on Monday, January 18th, 2021

Since the founding of our country, the treatment of juveniles in the criminal justice system has remained a prominent, everchanging, and often controversial issue.[1] During the 18th century, “children older than fourteen were determined to be able to understand the difference between right and wrong”[2] and “were treated as adults in the justice system.”[3] The…

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Piecemeal Devourment: Academic Freedom in Hungary

By Andras Pap on Tuesday, January 5th, 2021

Andras L. Pap[1] Abstract: Using the case study of Hungary, the author provides a snapshot of how academic freedom can be curtailed in a hybrid illiberal regime. The focus includes the freedom to (i) do research, (ii) publish and disseminate research results, and (iii) teach. The Article first provides an overview of recent assaults on…

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Ghost Theory

By Polatip Subanajouy on Wednesday, December 16th, 2020

Extreme cases by their definition are not representative of a system. Nevertheless, those cases, however extreme, can shed light on that system, if that system purports to encompass those cases.[i] Much debate concerning constitutional law concerns the weight that text[ii] and history should play in constitutional interpretation and construction[iii]. However, maybe a constitutional crisis (or…

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Mail-In Ballot Extensions: The Court’s Limited Role

By Taylor Kollmansberger on Thursday, November 19th, 2020

Despite the high scrutiny surrounding traditional voting alternatives this year, absentee voting and early voting are hardly novel concepts. Roughly 32 million people voted early in the 2012 General Election.[1] In the 2016 election, that number increased to 47 million people voting before Election Day.[2] In the 2020 General Election, that number shattered records coming…

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