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CONSTITUTIONAL INTERPRETATION: AN OVERVIEW OF ORIGINALISM AND LIVING CONSTITUTIONALISM

By Michael Stramaglia on Sunday, June 9th, 2019

Originalists today make, interpret and enforce the law by the original meaning of the Constitution as it was originally written.[1] The original meaning is how the terms of the Constitution were commonly understood at the time of ratification.[2] Most, if not all Originalists begin their analysis with the text of the Constitution.[3] Similarly, Textualists consider…

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Tax Software Companies are the Reason Americans Pay Fees to File Taxes

By Christina Everling on Friday, April 26th, 2019

The United States’ taxation system is often referred to as “voluntary” even though taxpayers are required to file returns and pay taxes. “Voluntary tax compliance” means taxpayers do so “without direct compulsion from the IRS.”[1] What this means is that payment of income taxes is mandatory, but taxpayers voluntarily calculate their taxes owed.[2] While the…

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Essay: A Historical Overview of Disenfranchisement, the Voting Rights Act, and Shelby County’s Impact on the 2018 Midterm Elections

By Sean McGrath on Thursday, March 21st, 2019

For nearly four decades, Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act required certain states and localities to garner pre-approval prior to implementing any changes in laws that affect voting.[1] That has all changed with a Supreme Court decision in 2013.[2] Since that time, instances of subtle (or not so subtle) voter discrimination has taken place…

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Do Parents Who Choose Not to Vaccinate Their Children Open Themselves Up to Liability?

By Adeline Sulentich on Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

The Supreme Court of the United States, in Troxel v. Granville,[1] reiterated the Constitutional protection granted to “the interest of parents in the care, custody, and control of their children.”[2] The Court described this liberty interest as being “perhaps the oldest of the fundamental liberty interests recognized by [the] Court.”[3] The Supreme Court explained that…

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Felony Disenfranchisement in Florida and the Passing of Amendment 4

By Nichole Jerrick on Tuesday, November 13th, 2018

“Apart from being a fundamental democratic right, voting is essential to a formerly incarcerated citizen’s rehabilitation. . . [t]hese restrictions serve only to further alienate and isolate millions of Americans as they work to regain normality in their lives.” – Rep. John Conyers (D-MI). Most states have voting restrictions for convicted felons.[1] These restrictions, known…

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