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Will Essential Workers be Able to Recover for Unsafe Workplace Conditions Amidst the COVID-19 Pandemic?

By Katelyn Healy on Monday, March 22nd, 2021

Imagine: you are classified as an essential worker defined by federal and state-level guidelines. Dependent upon the income from that position, you show up to work, day after day, during the COVID-19 pandemic even though much of the world remains at home. Although both your state and the federal government have issued safety guidelines for…

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Flawed Logic for Death Penalty Abolition: An Analysis of Unrequited Innocence in U.S. Capital Cases

By Michael Conklin on Monday, March 8th, 2021

Michael Conklin* Introduction The recent article, Unrequited Innocence in U.S. Capital Cases: Unintended Consequences of the Fourth Kind,[1]demonstrates many of the problems with abolitionist advocacy. Namely, the conflation of innocence with wrongful convictions and unaddressed issues with policy proposals. Innocence / wrongful conviction The actual position of the authors as to whether an innocent person…

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The Importance of Restorative Practices in Family Law

By Allison Trendle on Wednesday, February 17th, 2021

In Marriage Story, Alan Alda’s character wisely told his client, “I want you to know that eventually this will all be over, and whatever we win or lose, it’ll be the two of you having to figure this out together.”[1] Alda’s character referenced the contentious nature of divorce. Divorce proceedings often pit parties against each…

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Juvenile Justice Over Time: The Implementation of Wisconsin’s Statutory Exclusion for Certain Juvenile-Aged Offenders

By Rachel Martin on Monday, January 18th, 2021

Since the founding of our country, the treatment of juveniles in the criminal justice system has remained a prominent, everchanging, and often controversial issue.[1] During the 18th century, “children older than fourteen were determined to be able to understand the difference between right and wrong”[2] and “were treated as adults in the justice system.”[3] The…

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Piecemeal Devourment: Academic Freedom in Hungary

By Andras Pap on Tuesday, January 5th, 2021

Andras L. Pap[1] Abstract: Using the case study of Hungary, the author provides a snapshot of how academic freedom can be curtailed in a hybrid illiberal regime. The focus includes the freedom to (i) do research, (ii) publish and disseminate research results, and (iii) teach. The Article first provides an overview of recent assaults on…

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